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Special Friday Post - My Yahoo Portfolio Experience - Part 1

If you have read the Koo Review before then you know that we are avid readers.  I have especially been interested in finance and investing as of late, as well as some marketing.

One of the key items I've learned from reading The Intelligent Investor by Benjamin Graham were strategies on how to invest in the stock market.  I created a Yahoo Portfolio account to track five companies that I found on the 52 week low list that I would have picked back on July 14th to invest in.  

I purchased 100 shares of each company (to keep things simple).  My focus was:

1) Large cap companies.
2) A history of steady dividend payments.
3) Consistent positive net income for the past three years.
4) An established brand
5) The company sold or produced something that I understood

So as you see below this is how our portfolio did after three weeks.


So while it was not all great, you can see that the total gain was $558 as of August 4, 2017 at 10:45 a.m.

I'm really excited that this portfolio is moving in the right direction and I've learned a lot about stock selection through this exercises.

My biggest take-away is that it you should never under estimate companies that have a boring reputation.  For example:

COST is Costco and KSS is Kohls.  
The others are Cisco, Ford, and Exxon.    

Yet as you can see Costco and Kohls are the only reason that the portfolio is doing well.  They are also much more mundane than technology, cars, and energy.  

I think sometimes we get into a trap with brand recognition and the noise that surrounds technology and energy that we believe those are the best investments.  

Anyhow, if you are interested in specifics you can check out our other article about stock selection here.


Thanks for checking out our post and please follow or subscribe for more future posts.  We post new items every Monday, and today was a rare exception just to share this new piece of information.  

If you have comments, questions, or feedback, please write below and reach out!!

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